Giovanni Francesco Romanelli

As a student of Pietro da Cortona, Giovanni Francesco Romanelli was given a prestigious artistic debut by assisting the decoration of Rome’s Palazzo Barberini. Like his teacher, Romanelli was inducted into a group of artists supported by Pope Urban VIII and his nephew, Cardinal Francesco Barberini, whose patronage provided Romanelli with commissions throughout the churches and palaces of Rome and the Vatican. Characterized as espousing a classicized, restrained version of his master’s Roman Baroque style, Romanelli’s work possessed the richly decorative values of his teacher—often embellished with gilded stucco work—and yet with a subdued sense of energy. Upon the exile of the Barberini family, Romanelli accompanied his patrons to Paris, where he became a prominent artistic influence, commissioned to decorate the National Library and the summer apartments of the Queen Mother, Anne of Austria, within the Louvre.

Apulian Vase Painting

The Apulian vase painting tradition is considered as the leading South Italian style. The main centre of production was at Taras. Apulian red-figure vases were produced from circa 430 to 300 BC. The plain and ornate styles are distinguished. The main difference between them is that the plain style favoured bell craters, column kraters and smaller vessels, and that a single "plain" vessel rarely depicted more than four figures. The main subjects were mythological scenes, female heads, warriors in scenes of combat of farewell, and dionysiac thiasos imagery

Giovanni Battista Tiepolo

Giovanni Battista Tiepolo, also known as Gianbattista or Giambattista Tiepolo, was an Italian painter and printmaker from the Republic of Venice. He was prolific, and is considered to be among the traditional great Old Masters of that period. Successful from the beginning of his career, he has been described by Michael Levey as "the greatest decorative painter of eighteenth-century Europe, as well as its most able craftsman."