Giovanni Francesco Romanelli

As a student of Pietro da Cortona, Giovanni Francesco Romanelli was given a prestigious artistic debut by assisting the decoration of Rome’s Palazzo Barberini. Like his teacher, Romanelli was inducted into a group of artists supported by Pope Urban VIII and his nephew, Cardinal Francesco Barberini, whose patronage provided Romanelli with commissions throughout the churches and palaces of Rome and the Vatican. Characterized as espousing a classicized, restrained version of his master’s Roman Baroque style, Romanelli’s work possessed the richly decorative values of his teacher—often embellished with gilded stucco work—and yet with a subdued sense of energy. Upon the exile of the Barberini family, Romanelli accompanied his patrons to Paris, where he became a prominent artistic influence, commissioned to decorate the National Library and the summer apartments of the Queen Mother, Anne of Austria, within the Louvre.

Sotheby’s confirms a ‘bulletproof’ art market with $143.5 million contemporary sale

The auction house broke five artist records, with only four lots going unsold over the course of the night. By Colin Gleadell, March 8, 2017 The lights dimmed, the disco music pulsated,

Titian

Titian was a leading artist of the Italian Renaissance who painted works for Pope Paul III, King Philip II of Spain and Holy Roman Emperor Charles V.

Red-Figure Pottery

Red-figure vase painting is one of the most important styles of figural Greek and Italian vase painting. It developed in Athens around 520 BC and remained in use until the late 3rd century BC. It replaced the previously dominant style of black-figure vase painting within a few decades. Its modern name is based on the figural depictions in red colour on a black background, in contrast to the preceding black-figure style with black figures on a red background. The most important areas of production, apart from Attica, were in Southern Italy. The style was also adopted in other parts of Greece. Etruria became an important centre of production outside the Greek World.

Giambattista Tiepolo (1696 – 1770)

For those who know Tiepolo only as a decorative artist—genial magician who casts an enchanted and enchanting spell with his poetic tales culled from Ariosto and Tasso—the seriousness of his religious painting will come as a revelation. Not since Titian and Tintoretto had Venice seen a talent for transforming the laconic stories of the Bible and of the saints into a dramatic narrative. The richness and diversity of Tiepolo's imagination have long seemed to many the most modern aspect of his genius, and the last section of this exhibition has been conceived as a celebration of these traits.

Giovanni Battista Tiepolo

Giovanni Battista Tiepolo, also known as Gianbattista or Giambattista Tiepolo, was an Italian painter and printmaker from the Republic of Venice. He was prolific, and is considered to be among the traditional great Old Masters of that period. Successful from the beginning of his career, he has been described by Michael Levey as "the greatest decorative painter of eighteenth-century Europe, as well as its most able craftsman."

As an original painter, Camuccini belongs to the Neoclassicist school fostered in Rome by Anton Raphael Mengs. Camuccini's first major independent work, completed around 1798, was a large canvas of the Death of Caesar. This led to the assessment that Camuccini may have been influenced by Jacques-Louis David's classic Roman themes and style;[1] but it is more likely both were emerging from the rising Neoclassic refocus towards images of and derived from Greco-Roman themes.

Guercino Guercino Self portrait, c. 1635 Born Giovanni Francesco Barbieri February 8, 1591 Cento Died December 22, 1666 (aged 75) Bologna Nationality Italian Known for Painting Movement Baroque Giovanni Francesco Barbieri (February

Giuseppe Cesari (February 1568 – 3 July 1640) was an Italian Mannerist painter, also named Il Giuseppino and called Cavaliere d'Arpino, because he was created Cavaliere di Cristo by his patron Pope Clement VIII.