George Brainerd Burr

Burr was a colorist who believed in the precepts of a daring American Impressionism. Many of his watercolors and oil paintings are brilliantly polychromed with faceted areas of pure color over a bare surface creating a highly saturated and avant-garde example of this variation on the aesthetic of American Impressionism.

Arthur Elsley

Arthur John Elsley (20 November 1860 – 19 February 1952) was an English painter of the late Victorian and Edwardian periods, famous for his idyllic genre scenes of playful children and their pets. He achieved great popularity during his life and much of his work appeared in calendars, magazines and books.

2016…going, going GONG!

While people around the world have different customs for celebrating the first day of the year, almost all “ring in the new year” in some fashion or another. Some light fireworks,

Jennie Brownscombe

Jennie Augusta Brownscombe (December 10, 1850 – August 5, 1936) was an American painter, designer, etcher, commercial artist and illustrator. Brownscombe studied art for years in the United States and in Paris. She was a founding member, student and teacher at the Art Students League of New York. She made genre paintings, including revolutionary and colonial American history, most notably The Peace Ball held at Pilgrim Hall in Plymouth, Massachusetts. Her works are in many public collections and museums. In 1899 she was described by New York World as "one of America's best artists."

Alfred Stevens

Alfred Émile Léopold Stevens (11 May 1823 – 24 August 1906) was a Belgian painter, known for his paintings of elegant modern women. Alfred Stevens was born in Brussels. He

Rosa Bonheur

Rosa Bonheur was a French artist (an animalière (painter of animals)) and sculptor, known for her artistic realism. Her most well-known paintings are Ploughing in the Nivernais, first exhibited at the Paris Salon of 1848, and now at Musée d’Orsay in Paris, and The Horse Fair (in French: Le marché aux chevaux), which was exhibited at the Salon of 1853 (finished in 1855) and is now in the Metropolitan Museum of Art, in New York City. Bonheur is widely considered to be the most famous female painter of the nineteenth century.

Alfred Benjamin Cole was an English landscape painter.  He was the son of esteemed landscape painter George Cole (1810 – 1883).  Alfred, originally from London, traveled and painted many Landscape

Jean-Honore Fragonard

The French painter Jean-Honore Fragonard was born in Grasse in 1732 as the son of a perfume maker. Fragonard was taught by the important painter François Boucher, who instructed him in the necessary foundations for his shining career as a painter for the French court. But his luck did not last very long: Due to the French revolution in summer 1789, Fragonard lost his aristocratic clientèle and had to flee back to his home town, taking all his pictures with him. Until 1898 these were hanging in the Villa Fragonard.

As an original painter, Camuccini belongs to the Neoclassicist school fostered in Rome by Anton Raphael Mengs. Camuccini's first major independent work, completed around 1798, was a large canvas of the Death of Caesar. This led to the assessment that Camuccini may have been influenced by Jacques-Louis David's classic Roman themes and style;[1] but it is more likely both were emerging from the rising Neoclassic refocus towards images of and derived from Greco-Roman themes.

Edward Scriven Edward Scriven (Alcester 1775 – 23 August 1841 London) was an English engraver of portraits, in the stipple and chalk manner. Scriven was the pre-eminent engraver of his