Charles Townes Oil Painting of Horses in a Stable

Charles Towne Oil Painting Entitled Returning the Horses to the Stable

Oil Painting by the esteemed English artist Charles Towne (1763 – 1840) entitled Returning the Horses to the Stable | Oil on cradled wood panel | Depicting a traditional Towne rural equestrian scene.

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Additional information
  • Antique Oil Painting by the esteemed English artist Charles Towne (1763 – 1840) entitled Returning the Horses to the Stable | Oil on cradled wood panel | Depicting a traditional Towne rural equestrian scene showing a groom or stable boy returning horses to the barn in late afternoon.  Painting includes many of Charles Townes favorite subjects including a small white shetland or welsh pony, a stable boy, and white colored dog breeds | Housed in a 19th Century gold gesso wood frame (with a lattice cradle attached) | Approx. Measurements: 26″ H x 32″ W.

    About the artist: Charles Towne (1763–1840) was an English painter of landscapes, horses and other animals, horse-racing and hunting scenes. Not to be confused with the painter Charles Towne (1781–1854), “the younger”.

    Towne was born in Wigan, the son of Richard Town, a portrait-painter from Liverpool, and his wife Mary.  His talent for art was apparent from a young age and he received some training from landscape painter John Rathbone in Leeds.  He then worked as a coach and ornamental painter with his brother in Liverpool, and also worked for a time in Lancaster and Manchester.  In 1785 he married Margaret Harrison, a widow.

    In 1787 Towne exhibited a small landscape in an exhibition in Liverpool.  By the 1790s he was an established animal painter with a style reminiscent of Stubbs.  He lived in London from 1799 to 1804 during which time he exhibited at the Royal Academy.  He also added a final ‘e’ to his name.  He became a friend of fellow artists George Morland and De Loutherbourg.

    Between 1799 and 1823 he exhibited twelve works at the Royal Academy and four at the British Institution.  He returned to Liverpool in 1810, and was a founder member of the Liverpool Academy, becoming vice-president in 1812-13, and exhibiting his work there for several years on and off.  He resided in Liverpool until 1837, when he apparently returned to London, dying there in 1840.

    Towne painted landscapes and animals, and obtained great celebrity in Lancashire and Cheshire by his portraits of horses, dogs, and cattle.  Many of his pictures were small, but occasionally he ventured into landscapes with cattle of larger size.  He also painted in watercolour, and was a candidate for admission to the Watercolour Society in 1809.  His work was reasonably well regarded by his contemporary Joseph Farrington, though he also noted that Towne was a man of “coarse, debased manners and conversation“.  According to artist W. S. Sparrow, “his landscapes are minutely detailed and have a Dutch mannerism; animals and figures are put in with diligent and affectionate care“.  However the Dictionary of National Biography commented that his work “though carefully drawn” was “wanting in spirit and originality”.  [Wikipedia]

  • Artist / Maker

    Charles Towne (1763 – 1840)

    Date

    19th Century

    Frame

    Yes

    Kind

    Paintings

    Medium

    Oil