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Signed Leather First Edition Book Titled “Journals 1939-1983” by Stephen Spender, Edited by John Goldsmith

$54.95

New Signed Leather Limited First Edition Book Titled “Journals 1939-1983” by Stephen Spender | Fine New Leather Bound Signed edition published by Franklin Library in 1985

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  • New Signed Leather Limited First Edition Book Titled “Journals 1939-1983” by Stephen Spender, and Edited by John Goldsmith  | Fine New Leather Bound Signed edition published by Franklin Library in 1985 | Leather binding has raised bands on spine and gilt lettering of title and author | Also features gilt page edges, ornate cover design, ribbon page marker and marble endpapers, New in publishers wrap | | | in FINE, unread condition. Sir Stephen Harold Spender, who lived from 1909—1995, was an English poet, novelist and essayist who concentrated on themes of social injustice and the class struggle in his work. He was appointed Poet Laureate of the U.S. Library of Congress in 1965. Spender was Professor of English at UNIVERSITY COLLEGE, London in the 1970s. Spender was made a COMMANDER OF THE ORDER OF THE BRITISH EMPIRE at the 1962 Queen’s Birthday honors and knighted in 1983. At a ceremony commemorating the 40th Anniversary of the NORMANDY INVASION, D-DAY on 6 June 1984, President RONALD REAGAN quoted from Spender’s poem “The Truly Great.” Spender said: “I am going to keep a journal because I cannot accept the fact that I feel so shattered that I cannot write at all,” Stephen Spender wrote on September 3 1939. He meant, of course, that he couldn’t write poetry, which he always regarded as his principal job. His feeling shattered was not just because Britain had declared war on Germany that day, but also because his first wife, Inez Pearn, had recently left him. “It so happens that the world has broken just at the moment when my own life has broken,” he wrote, and this combination of the public and the private, of world events and personal dilemmas, was characteristic of his life and career. Spender kept “journals” throughout his life, in which he analyzed his own work and character, and those of his friends, as well as thoughtful commentary on world events.

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