Antique Map “A Balloon View of London (as seen from the North)” by John Henry Banks, Appleyard & Hetling c.1854

 Antique Map “A Balloon View of London (as seen from the North)” by John Henry Banks, Appleyard & Hetling c.1854

A Balloon View of London (as seen from the North) London: Appleyard & Hetling Circa 1854 | Framed under archival glass | Approx. Dimensions: 25″ H x 40″ W

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Additional information
  • Antique Map Entitled “A Balloon View of London (as seen from the North)” by John Henry Banks | Published: London, Appleyard & Hetling, Circa 1854 | A Balloon View of London (as seen from the North) London: Appleyard & Hetling Circa 1854 | Framed under archival glass | Approx. Dimensions: 25″ H x 40″ W | A very detailed ‘balloon-view’ of London, originally published by John Henry Banks for the Great Exhibition of 1851. It would seem the northern viewpoint was chosen to make the Crystal Palace more obvious, with the open space of Hyde Park in front of it. On the right edge are Vauxhall Bridge, Hyde Park Corner, Kensington Gardens and Battersea; on the left the Tower and the Docks at Limehouse and Deptford; in the foreground King’s Cross and Regent’s Park; and on the far horizon Kennington, the Oval and the Walworth Road. Also marked are the Vauxhall Pleasure Gardens, the Great Western Railway, the Millbank Prison (where Tate Britain now stands) and the Surrey Zoological Gardens. Bottom right is Lord’s Cricket Ground, next to the Clergy Orphan Asylum. An addition from State 3 is King’s Cross Station, opened 1852 HYDE: No. 3, state 4 of 6 [Ref: 13964]

    Panoramic, fold-out maps began to be published in the 1850s and 1860s, forerunners of the famous A to Z guides. One of the most successful was published by Appleyard & Hetling in 1854, ‘In a Case for the Pocket’, priced one shilling and sixpence. It was comprehensively entitled A Balloon View of London Taken by Daguerreotype Process, Exhibiting Eight Square Miles, Showing all Railway Stations, Public Buildings, Parks, Palaces, Squares, Streets etc … Forming a Complete Street Guide. In fact the ‘daguerreotype’ claim was certainly misleading, as there is no record of a genuine aerial photograph of a city before 1858–59 (Paris and Boston were to be the first). But the combination of balloon and photography evidently had a fashionable, up-to-the-minute appeal. [Falling Upwards by Richard Holmes, London William Collins 2013, p. 69].

  • Artist / Maker

    John Henry Banks

    Date

    19th Century

    Frame

    Yes

    Kind

    Books, Maps, Documents and Manuscripts, Maps

    Medium

    Engraving

    Origin

    United Kingdom

    Other

    Glass Covering

    Subject

    Map

    Support

    Paper