King George III Land Patent

King George III Land Patent on Vellum with Attached Wax Seal in Tin Case

King George III of England (1738 – 1820) Document on Vellum: Land Patent | With attached original wax seal inside original tin case. Very good condition; a few minor losses, staining, and some creases. Great Seal appended with decorative cord. The 5.5″ diameter wax seal is in overall very good condition. The relief patterns are still quite enhanced. Neatly secured and protected in a tin/metal case.

Description
Additional information
  • King George III of England (1738 – 1820) Document on Vellum: Land Patent | With attached original wax seal inside original tin case. Very good condition; a few minor losses, staining, and some creases. Great Seal appended with decorative cord. The 5.5″ diameter wax seal is in overall very good condition. The relief patterns are still quite enhanced. Neatly secured and protected in a tin/metal case.

    A land patent is an exclusive land grant made by a sovereign entity with respect to a particular tract of land. To make such a grant “patent”, a sovereign (proprietary landowner) must document the land grant, securely sign and seal the document (patent), and openly publish the documents for the public to see. An official land patent is the highest evidence of right, title, and interest to a defined area. It is usually granted by a central, federal, or state government to an individual or to a private company.

    Besides patent, other terms for the certificate that grants such rights include first-title deed and final certificate. In the United States, all claims of land ownership can be traced back to a land patent, first-title deed, or similar document regarding land originally owned by France, Spain, the United Kingdom, Mexico, Russia, or Native Americans.

    A land patent is known in law as “letters patent”, and usually issues to the original grantee and to their heirs and assigns forever. The patent stands as supreme title to the land because it attests that all evidence of title existent before its issue date was reviewed by the sovereign authority under which it was sealed and was so sealed as irrefutable; thus, at law the land patent itself so becomes the title to the land defined within its four corners.

    Letters patent (always in the plural) are a type of legal instrument in the form of a published written order issued by a monarch, president, or other head of state, generally granting an office, right, monopoly, title, or status to a person or corporation. Letters patent can be used for the creation of corporations or government offices, or for the granting of city status or a coat of arms. Letters patent are issued for the appointment of representatives of the Crown, such as governors and governors-general of Commonwealth realms, as well as appointing a Royal Commission. In the United Kingdom they are also issued for the creation of peers of the realm.

    Letters patent are so named from the Latin verb pateo, to lie open, exposed, accessible. The originator’s seal was attached pendent from the document, so that it did not have to be broken in order for the document to be read.

    Litterae in Latin meant “that which is written” or “writing”, in the sense of letters of the alphabet placed together in meaningful sequence on a writing surface, not a specific format of composition as the modern word “letter” suggests. Thus letters patent do not equate to an open letter but rather to any form of document, deed, contract, letter, despatch, edict, decree, epistle etc. made public.

    They are called “letters” (plural) from their Latin name litterae patentes, used by medieval and later scribes when the documents were written in Latin, in the ancient sense of a collection of letters of the alphabet arranged to be read rather than in the modern sense of an “epistle” or item of correspondence: thus no singular form exists.

    Letters patent are a form of open or public proclamation and a vestigial exercise of extra-parliamentary power by a monarch or president. Prior to the establishment of Parliament, the monarch ruled absolutely by the issuing of his personal written orders, open or closed.

    They can thus be contrasted with the Act of Parliament, which is in effect a written order by Parliament, approved by the monarch whose signature gives it force. No explicit government approval is contained within letters patent, only the seal or signature of the monarch.

    Parliament today tolerates only a very narrow exercise of the royal prerogative by issuance of letters patent, and such documents are issued with prior informal government approval, or indeed are now generated by government itself with the monarch’s seal affixed as a mere formality. In their original form they were simply written instructions or orders from the sovereign, whose order was law, which were made public to reinforce their effect.

    For the sake of good governance it is clearly of little use if the sovereign appoints a person to a position of authority if he does not at the same time inform those over whom such authority is to be exercised of the validity of the appointment.

    According to the United Kingdom Ministry of Justice, there are 92 different types of letters patent.  The Patent Rolls are made up of office copies of English (and later United Kingdom) royal letters patent, which run in an almost unbroken series from 1201 to the present day, with most of those to 1625 having been published.

  • Weight

    3lb.

    Height

    30"

    Width

    28"

    Depth

    1"

    Weight

    3lb.

    Height

    30"

    Width

    28"

    Depth

    1"

    Artist / Maker

    King George III

    Date

    18th Century

    Kind

    Books, Maps, Documents and Manuscripts, Collectibles, Documents & Manuscripts, Ephemera, Medals & Awards, Memorabilia, Political

    Medium

    Ink

    Support

    Vellum

    Origin

    United Kingdom

    Other

    Seal, Signed

    Subject

    Document, Historical

    Title

    English Land Patent Issued by King George III