Carte de Visite photograph of Civil War Confederate Major General Pierre G. T. Beauregard

Rare Original Carte De Visite Photograph of Civil War General PIERRE G. T. BEAUREGARD

Rare Original Carte de Visite photograph of Civil War Confederate Major General Pierre G. T. Beauregard | PIERRE G. T. BEAUREGARD (1818-1893) was the Confederate general who initiated the attack on Fort Sumter that started the Civil War | Beauregard also led with distinction at First Bull Run, Shiloh, and in the defense of Richmond, Virginia | This is an original Carte de visite photograph of General Beauregard in a chest-up pose in federal uniform in an oval image | Has General Beauregard’s name penned on the lower mount | The photograph has a Backstamp by the Augusta Photographic Gallery of Art, Augusta, Ga.

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  • Rare Original Carte de Visite photograph of Civil War Confederate Major General Pierre G. T. Beauregard | PIERRE G. T. BEAUREGARD (1818-1893) was the Confederate general who initiated the attack on Fort Sumter that started the Civil War | Beauregard also led with distinction at First Bull Run, Shiloh, and in the defense of Richmond, Virginia | This is an original Carte de visite photograph of General Beauregard in a chest-up pose in federal uniform in an oval image | Has General Beauregard’s name penned on the lower mount | The photograph has a Backstamp by the Augusta Photographic Gallery of Art, Augusta, Ga. | Very Good Condition: Faded slightly, with two small ink spots.

    Pierre Gustave Toutant-Beauregard (May 28, 1818 – February 20, 1893) was an American military officer who was the first prominent general of the Confederate States Army during the American Civil War. Today, he is commonly referred to as P. G. T. Beauregard, but he rarely used his first name as an adult. He signed correspondence as G. T. Beauregard.

    Trained as a civil engineer at the United States Military Academy, Beauregard served with distinction as an engineer in the Mexican–American War. Following a brief appointment as superintendent at West Point in 1861, after the South seceded he resigned from the United States Army and became the first brigadier general in the Confederate States Army. He commanded the defenses of Charleston, South Carolina, at the start of the Civil War at Fort Sumter on April 12, 1861. Three months later he won the First Battle of Bull Run near Manassas, Virginia.

    Beauregard commanded armies in the Western Theater, including at the Battle of Shiloh in Tennessee, and the Siege of Corinth in northern Mississippi. He returned to Charleston and defended it in 1863 from repeated naval and land attacks by Union forces. His greatest achievement was saving the important industrial city of Petersburg, Virginia, in June 1864, and thus the nearby Confederate capital of Richmond, from assaults by overwhelmingly superior Union Army forces.

    His influence over Confederate strategy was lessened by his poor professional relationships with President Jefferson Davis and other senior generals and officials. In April 1865, Beauregard and his commander, General Joseph E. Johnston, convinced Davis and the remaining cabinet members that the war needed to end. Johnston surrendered most of the remaining armies of the Confederacy, including Beauregard and his men, to Major General William Tecumseh Sherman. Following his military career, Beauregard returned to Louisiana, where he served as a railroad executive, and became wealthy as a promoter of the Louisiana Lottery.

    The carte de visite (French: [kaʁt də vizit], visiting card), abbreviated CdV, was a type of small photograph which was patented in Paris by photographer André Adolphe Eugène Disdéri in 1854, although first used by Louis Dodero. It was usually made of an albumen print, which was a thin paper photograph mounted on a thicker paper card. The size of a carte de visite is 54.0 mm (2.125 in) × 89 mm (3.5 in) mounted on a card sized 64 mm (2.5 in) × 100 mm (4 in). In 1854, Disdéri had also patented a method of taking eight separate negatives on a single plate, which reduced production costs. The Carte de Visite was slow to gain widespread use until 1859, when Disdéri published Emperor Napoleon III’s photos in this format. This made the format an overnight success. The new invention was so popular it was known as “cardomania” and it spread throughout Europe and then quickly to America and the rest of the world.

    Each photograph was the size of a visiting card, and such photograph cards were traded among friends and visitors. Albums for the collection and display of cards became a common fixture in Victorian parlors. The immense popularity of these card photographs led to the publication and collection of photographs of prominent persons.

    The carte de visite photograph proved to be a very popular item during the American Civil War. Soldiers, friends and family members would have a means of inexpensively obtaining photographs and sending them to loved ones in small envelopes. Photos of Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant, and other celebrities of the era became an instant hit in the North. People were not only buying photographs of themselves, but also collecting photographs of celebrities.

  • Weight

    1lb.

    Height

    3.5"

    Width

    2.5"

    Depth

    1"

    Weight

    1lb.

    Height

    3.5"

    Width

    2.5"

    Depth

    1"

    Kind

    Books, Maps, Documents and Manuscripts, Collectibles, Documents & Manuscripts, Ephemera, Memorabilia, Militaria, Photographic Art

    Date

    19th Century

    Medium

    Albumen, Photograph

    Artist / Maker

    Pierre G. T. Beauregard