Painting of Custer’s Last Stand by Charles Kemper

Painting of Custer’s Last Stand by Charles Kemper

This Dramatic Watercolor Painting by western painter Charles Kemper depicting the fall of General George Armstrong Custer’s 7th Cavalry at the Battle of the Little Bighorn (Little Bighorn River, in southeastern Montana), known to the Lakota and other Plains Indians as the Battle of the Greasy Grass  | Very remarkable color and detail | Signed and dated (1969) by the artist on lower right corner | Watercolor on Paper

Description
Additional information
  • This Dramatic Watercolor Painting by western painter Charles Kemper depicting the fall of General George Armstrong Custer’s 7th Cavalry at the Battle of the Little Bighorn (Little Bighorn River, in southeastern Montana), known to the Lakota and other Plains Indians as the Battle of the Greasy Grass  | Very remarkable color and detail | Signed and dated (1969) by the artist on lower right corner | Watercolor on Paper | Framed and matted under glass | Approx. Dimensions: 38″ W x 26″ H.

    The Battle of the Little Bighorn was an armed engagement between combined forces of the Lakota, Northern Cheyenne, and Arapaho tribes and the 7th Cavalry Regiment of the United States Army. The battle, which occurred June 25–26, 1876, along the Little Bighorn River in the Crow Indian Reservation in southeastern Montana Territory, was the most significant action of the Great Sioux War of 1876.

    The fight was an overwhelming victory for the Lakota, Northern Cheyenne, and Arapaho, who were led by several major war leaders including Crazy Horse and Chief Gall and had been inspired by the visions of Sitting Bull (Tȟatȟáŋka Íyotake). The U.S. 7th Cavalry, including the Custer Battalion, a force of 700 men led by Lieutenant Colonel George Armstrong Custer, suffered a major defeat. Five of the 7th Cavalry’s twelve companies were annihilated; Custer was killed, as were two of his brothers, a nephew, and a brother-in-law. The total U.S. casualty count included 268 dead and 55 severely wounded (six died later from their injuries), including four Crow Indian scouts and two Pawnee Indian scouts.

    Public response to the Great Sioux War varied in the immediate aftermath of the battle, but over the following decades Custer and his troops became iconic, even heroic figures in American history, a status that lasted into the 1960s. The battle, and Custer’s actions in particular, have been studied extensively by historians.

  • Weight

    10lb.

    Height

    26"

    Width

    38"

    Depth

    2"

    Weight

    10lb.

    Height

    26"

    Width

    38"

    Depth

    2"

    Artist / Maker

    Charles Kemper

    Frame

    Yes

    Kind

    Paintings

    Medium

    Watercolor

    Other

    Glass Covering, Matted, Signed

    Size

    L (up to 40 in.)

    Support

    Paper

    Title

    Custer’s Last Stand