16WDC010-807

Leroy Neiman Hand Signed Lithograph

Description
Additional information
  • Beautiful offset limited edition lithograph of Leroy Neiman’s (1921 – 2012) painting entitled Mixed Doubles | The print is signed “LeRoy Neiman 75” in the plate, and hand signed by the artist in pencil to the lower right | A certificate of authenticity from the previous owner is attached to the back | The lithograph is double matted and framed | Condition:  Very Good, Small scratch to plexiglass at bottom left, slight wave in paper and mat at top | Dimensions:  28.25″ W x 30.5″ H x 1.0″ Overall measurement includes frame | This is a highly sought after artist authorized lithograph, and is not a serigraph, digital print or poster.

    LeRoy Neiman (born Leroy Leslie Runquist, June 8, 1921 – June 20, 2012) was an American artist known for his brilliantly colored, expressionist paintings and screen prints of athletes, musicians, and sporting events.  Of all contemporary American artists, LeRoy Neiman’s appeal to both critical and popular audiences is nearly matchless with respect to longevity, consistency and sustained success. For both substance and style, he is immediately recognizable: a visual chronicler of humanity at sport and play, delivered in a bold, colorful amalgamation of elements from Social Realism, Abstract Expressionism and Abstract Action Painting. His images have graced the walls of museums and galleries, clubs and private homes. Neiman is egalitarian in his thematic choices, for although he has gained a considerable reputation for representing society’s creme de la creme – aristocrats, celebrities, major sports figures – he is as much interested in the activities of more ordinary folk – barkeepers and showgirls, stableboys and beachgoers. It is the vitality of the moment that captures his attention and which he, in turn, communicates to a worldwide audience.

    Since his entry to the art world in the early 1950’s, Neiman’s singular style has excited the imagination by translating feeling into form with bold line, brilliant color and complex composition. Abstract Expressionism freed the artist from content, changing the focus to the process of painting. The gesture, the event, became paramount in importance. Neiman embraced the conceptual framework of the movement, but didn’t abandon the figurative element. Instead, his work represents a hybrid of ideals: the pure, radiant color of the Fauvists, the gesture of the Abstract Expressionists, the Social Realists’ desire to visually comment upon the lives of their contemporaries. Upon close inspection, a Neiman image appears to be a convergence of abstract shapes. It is distance that resolves the shapes into dynamic figures – people and animals that move and interact with an energy that seems barely contained by the canvas.

    A lithograph is an authorized copy of an original work created by the artist himself or other skilled craftsmen. A lithograph is rarely worth more than the original artwork it reproduces, but if the print quality is excellent and the production numbers are low, it may still have significant value in the art world. The printing process which creates a lithograph is different from other traditional methods. Most printing presses require the printmaker to etch an image or text into metal plates or physically carve out the image on blocks of wood or other soft material. To create a lithograph, however, no etching is required. The artist uses a set of greasy crayons or pencils to draw a mirrored image of the original artwork onto a smooth stone tablet. This is by far the most time-consuming part of the lithograph process. After the image has been recreated to the satisfaction of the original artist or other authority, it is ready to be turned into a lithograph. The lithographic process hinges on the principle that oil and water cannot mix. An oil-based variety of ink is applied directly to the plate and immediately bonds with the equally greasy crayon lines. Water is then wiped onto the remaining unpainted areas to discourage the ink from smearing. A sheet of paper, preferably one with a high cotton content, is then placed over the entire plate. The inked stone or metal plate and the paper are placed in a press and light pressure is used to transfer some of the ink. If the original image were a monochrome pen and ink drawing, this would be the only press run necessary. A color lithograph of an elaborate Van Gogh painting, however, might require several different runs with up to four different color inks — black, red, yellow and blue. The same paper would be placed precisely over the re-inked plates, eventually creating a satisfactory lithograph copy. This same process is used to create color pages in newspapers. Since the process for creating a lithograph can be just as time-consuming and detailed as an original painting, printing runs are often kept low to preserve value. A signed lithograph likely has a limited number of copies, customarily making the lithographed print more valuable.

  • Weight

    5lb.

    Height

    30.5"

    Width

    28.25"

    Depth

    1"

    Weight

    5lb.

    Height

    30.5"

    Width

    28.25"

    Depth

    1"

    Artist / Maker

    Leroy Neiman

    Date

    20th Century

    Kind

    Prints

    Medium

    Lithograph

    Origin

    American

    Other

    Glass Covering, Matted

    Subject

    Figurative, Genre, Sports Scene

    Support

    Paper

    Title

    Mixed Doubles