Jennie Augusta Brownscombe Engraving of The Peace Ball

Large Rare Historical Hand Signed Engraving by Jennie Augusta Brownscombe

Outstanding and Rare 19th Century Hand Signed Engraving by Jennie Augusta Brownscombe (American, New York 1850-1936) | Hand Signed by Artist Brownscombe to lower left | Original Title “A Ball Celebrating the Victory of Yorktown.–Fredericksburg, Va. 1781, 1897” | Short Title “The Peace Ball” | Marked in plate “Copyright 1896″ | Housed in Beautiful Gold Frame | Dimensions:  34.5″ x 46.5” | Other signed engravings of The Peace Ball are extremely rare, if they still exist at all.

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Additional information
  • Truly Historical.  Outstanding and Rare 19th Century Hand Signed Engraving by Jennie Augusta Brownscombe (American, New York 1850-1936) | Hand Signed by Artist Brownscombe to lower left | Original Title “A Ball Celebrating the Victory of Yorktown.–Fredericksburg, Va. 1781, 1897” | Short Title “The Peace Ball” | Marked in plate “Copyright 1896″ | Housed in Beautiful Gold Frame | Dimensions:  34.5″ x 46.5” | Other signed engravings of The Peace Ball are extremely rare, if they still exist at all.

    Brownscombe painted The Peace Ball with oil on canvas between 1895 and 1897.  The renowned painting depicted Washington introducing his mother to Gilbert du Motier, Marquis de Lafayette and Jean-Baptiste Donatien de Vimeur, comte de Rochambeau.  The painting is now displayed at the Newark Museum, New Jersey.

    The Ball celebrating the victory at Yorktown was held in the Washington Tavern (later named the Rising Sun Tavern) located in Fredericksburg, Virginia (See Image of National Historical Register).  The tavern was built by Charles Washington, George Washington’s youngest brother, in 1760.  Charles sold the tavern to George Weedon roughly ten years later.

    In the hands of a later host, George Weedon, the tavern became a political as well as social center. Weedon was a former German officer from Hamburg who fought in the French and Indian campaigns and settled in Fredericksburg. It was a favorite meeting place of Virginia Revolutionary patriots: George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, Patrick Henry, George Mason, Hugh Mercer, John Marshall, the Lees, and other colonial leaders on their way from the South to Philadelphia. Here George Mason, George Wythe, Edmund Penaleton, Thomas Jefferson, and Thomas Ludwell Lee met on January 13, 1777, and outlined the bill that Jefferson later phrased and Madison presented to the Virginia Assembly in 1785 as the Statute of Virginia for Religious Liberty.

    “The Peace Ball, attended by Washington and his mother, his officers, LaPayette, Rochambeau, Admiral de Gras, and others to celebrate the victory at Yorktown, was held in 1781 in the assembly room which has since burned. Marie-Joseph Paul Yves Roch Gilbert du Motier, Marquis de Lafayette (French pronunciation: [maʁki də la fajɛt]; 6 September 1757 – 20 May 1834), in the U.S. often known simply as Lafayette, was a French aristocrat and military officer who fought in the American Revolutionary War. A close friend of George Washington, Alexander Hamilton, and Thomas Jefferson, Lafayette was a key figure in the French Revolution of 1789 and the July Revolution of 1830.”  From National Registry Nomination Form.

    Marshal Jean-Baptiste Donatien de Vimeur, comte de Rochambeau (French pronunciation: [ʁɔʃɑ̃bo]; 1 July 1725 – 10 May 1807) was a French nobleman and general who played a major role in helping the Thirteen Colonies win independence during the American Revolution. During this time, he served as commander-in-chief of the French Expeditionary Force that embarked from France in order to help the American Continental Army fight against British forces.

    Jennie Augusta Brownscombe (December 10, 1850 – August 5, 1936) was an American painter, designer, etcher, commercial artist and illustrator. Brownscombe studied art for years in the United States and in Paris. She was a founding member, student and teacher at the Art Students League of New York. She made genre paintings and engravings, especially revolutionary and colonial American history.  Her works are in many important private and public collections and museums. In 1899 she was described by New York World as “one of America’s best artists.”

    Brownscombe was among a group of artists of the Colonial Revival Movement that admired colonial heroes like George Washington and colonial history, inspired by the 1876 centennial. Other artists included Howard Pyle, Jean Leon Gerome Ferris, Henry Alexander Ogden, Edward Percy Moran and John Ward Dunsmore. Their works, inspired by earlier artwork and George Washington biographies, were publicized in color in books, magazines, calendars and other commercial products, utilizing contemporary advances in lithographic printing. Many were also sold into private collections. She was also becoming more aware of the colonial roots of her mother’s family.

    Of the paintings she made of historic figures, she made 20 or more paintings of George Washington, some of which were reproduced by Gerlach Barklow Company, including the Marriage of George and Martha Washington and The First Meeting of Colonel Washington and Mrs. Curtis, which were purchased from Brownscombe in 1919 and 1920. She made paintings of other colonial scenes in the 1890s; Between 1895 and 1897 she made The Peace Ball which depicted Washington introducing his mother to Gilbert du Motier, Marquis de Lafayette and Jean-Baptiste Donatien de Vimeur, comte de Rochambeau. She painted scenes of Dolley Madison hosting a ball, the Liberty Bell being rung by a man, and Betsy Ross sewing the American flag.

    Jennie Augusta Brownscombe is a truly historically important artist, having broken through what was a traditionally a male only profession of art, espcially visual arts.

  • Weight

    10lb.

    Height

    34.5"

    Width

    46.5"

    Depth

    2"

    Weight

    10lb.

    Height

    34.5"

    Width

    46.5"

    Depth

    2"

    Artist / Maker

    Jennie Brownscombe

    Date

    19th Century

    Frame

    Yes

    Kind

    Prints

    Medium

    Engraving

    Origin

    American

    Other

    Glass Covering, Matted

    Size

    XL (greater than 40 in.)

    Subject

    Figurative, Historical, Interiorscape, Military, Portrait

    Support

    Woven Paper

    Title

    The Peace Ball