U.S. WWI Helmet

Remarkable WW1 American Doughboy Helmet (M1917)

An American doughboy Helmet from WW1 | The liner and chinstrap is still intact and  in great condition | The original paint is still complete | Helmet was unit marked (Co. A 3rd Engineers Oahu T.H.) by soldier that wore it | In Excellent Condition for its age and use.

Description
Additional information
  • An American doughboy Helmet from WW1 | The liner and chinstrap is still intact and  in great condition | The original paint is still complete | Helmet was unit marked (Co. A 3rd Engineers Oahu T.H.) by soldier that wore it | This helmet was used by a soldier that was later stationed in Oahu. At that time, the 3rd Engineers was responsible for building the majority of the military installations on Oahu Island in Hawaii. Besides being Unit Marked, the Helmet is also marked 4A | In Excellent Museum Condition for its age and use.

    The American Doughboy helmet was initially manufactured in England and was the UK patented Brodie helmet.  The Helmet was a steel combat helmet designed and patented in London in 1915 by John Leopold Brodie. In modified form it became the Helmet, steel, Mark I in Britain and the M1917 Helmet in the U.S. Colloquially, it was called the shrapnel helmet, Tommy helmet, tin hat, and in the United States the doughboy helmet. Worn by Australians during WW2 and sometimes known as Panic Hat. It was also known as the dishpan hat, tin pan hat, washbasin, battle bowler (when worn by officers), and Kelly helmet. The US version, the M1917, was copied from the British Mk 1 steel helmet of 1916. The German Army called it the Salatschüssel (salad bowl).

  • Weight

    5lb.

    Height

    12"

    Width

    12"

    Depth

    12"

    Weight

    5lb.

    Height

    12"

    Width

    12"

    Depth

    12"

    Date

    1917

    Title

    WWI American Doughboy Military Helmet

    Kind

    Collectibles, Ephemera, Memorabilia, Militaria, Weapons

    Medium

    Steel

    Subject

    Battle Scene, Historical, Military, Weapon, WWI