Black Figure Lekythos

Rare Attic Black-Figure Lekythos

Attic (Attica, Greece) black-figure lekythos (Greek Pottery Vessel) | 5th Century BC; ca. 475 – 450 BC | The body of the vase is decorated with palmettes, black banding down towards the foot, a ray pattern around the shoulder and the mouth dipped in black | Dimensions: H: 6 1/2 in (16.4 cm) | From an Ex English private collection.

Description
Additional information
  • A wonderful Attic (Attica, Greece) black-figure lekythos (Greek Pottery Vessel) | 5th Century BC; ca. 475 – 450 BC | The body of the vase is decorated with palmettes, black banding down towards the foot, a ray pattern around the shoulder and the mouth dipped in black | Dimensions: H: 6 1/2 in (16.4 cm) | From an Ex English private collection.

    Attica (Greek: Αττική, Attikḗ or Attikī́; Ancient Greek: [atːikɛ̌ː] or Modern: [atiˈci]) is a historical region that encompasses the city of Athens, the capital of Greece. The historical region is centered on the Attic peninsula, which projects into the Aegean Sea. The modern administrative region of Attica is more extensive than the historical region and includes the Saronic Islands, Cythera, and the municipality of Troizinia on the Peloponnesian mainland. The history of Attica is tightly linked with that of Athens, which, from the classical period, was one of the most important cities in the ancient world.

    A lekythos (plural lekythoi) is a type of Ancient Greek vessel used for storing oil (Greek λήκυθος), especially olive oil. It has a narrow body and one handle attached to the neck of the vessel, and is thus a narrow type of jug, with no pouring lip; the oinochoe is more like a modern jug.

    The black-figure technique was first applied in the middle of the 7th century BC, during the period of Proto-Attic vase painting. Influenced by pottery from Corinth, which offered the highest quality at the time, Attic vase painters switched to the new technology between about 635 BC and the end of the century.

    Attica Pottery: Attic black-figure vases comprise the largest and at the same time most significant vase collection, second only to Attic red-figure vases. Attic potters benefitted from the excellent, iron-rich clay found in Attica. High quality Attic black-figure vases have a uniform, glossy, pitch-black coating and the color-intensive terra cotta clay foundation has been meticulously smoothened. Women’s skin is always indicated with a white opaque color, which is also frequently used for details such as individual horses, clothing or ornaments. The most outstanding Attic artists elevated vase painting to a graphic art, but a large number of average quality and mass-market products were also produced. The outstanding significance of Attic pottery comes from their almost endless repertoire of scenes covering a wide range of themes. These provide rich testimonials especially in regard to mythology, but also to daily life. On the other hand, there are virtually no images referring to contemporary events. Such references are only occasionally evident in the form of annotations, for example when kalos inscriptions are painted on a vase. Vases were produced for the domestic market on the one hand, and were important for celebrations or in connection with ritual acts. On the other hand, they were also an important export product sold throughout the Mediterranean area. For this reason most of the surviving vases come from Etruscan necropolises.

    Examples of Attic Black Figure Lekythos are owned by numerous important museums and galleries.  E.g. Getty Museum; Louvre (Paris); and the MET Museum (NY).

  • Weight

    5lb.

    Height

    6.5"

    Width

    4"

    Depth

    4"

    Weight

    5lb.

    Height

    6.5"

    Width

    4"

    Depth

    4"

    Kind

    Ceramics, Pottery & Crystal, Collectibles, Ethnographic Art & Ancient Artifacts, Prehistoric Art