Greek Gnathia-ware epichysis from Apulia

Magnificent Greek Apulian Gnathia-ware epichysis

A Stunning Greek Gnathia-ware Epichysis from Apulia | 4th Century BC | Measures H: 8 1/8 in (20.6 cm).

Description
Additional information
  • A Stunning Greek Gnathia-ware epichysis from Apulia | 4th Century BC | The vase has a slender spout and elegant handle.  Its central body motif features bands of ornate scrolls and rosettes, waves, petals and crenellations.  The beautiful vessel still retains a remarkable metallic sheen | Measures H: 8 1/8 in (20.6 cm) | In very fine condition.

    An Epichysis is a form of ancient Greek jug.  The Epichysis was made in Apulia and decorated in the Gnathia style using multiple colors, ca. 325–300 BC. These vessels were used for pouring wine and are characterized by a long neck and spout, with a high looped handle.

    Gnathia vases (in greek “γνάθια”) are a type of ancient South Italian (Magna Grecia) vase painting of the 4th century BC.It a Greek type Pottery.  The painted pottery of the Hellenistic period differs considerably from the red-figure creations of the 4th c. BC. A characteristic group of Hellenistic pottery is that of the so-called “West Slope” vases, which owe their name to the discovery of representative examples on the west slope of the Athenian Acropolis. The decoration – mainly vegetal motifs such as ivy leaves – is executed in added reddish brown or white clay on the black-glaze ground. The first examples of this group appeared in the Attic Kerameikos around the mid-4th c. BC, the only difference being that on these the added clay was gilded. West Slope vases appeared in their typical form in the early 3rd c. BC, while the latest ones date from the 1st c. BC. In the latter stages of the style incised decoration became common. These vases were made in other places too, such as Pella and Pergamon and enjoyed wide distribution throughout the Eastern Mediterranean. Pottery with similar decoration has also been identified in the West and is named Gnathia, after the city of Egnatia (Gnathia) in Apulia, where such vases were first discovered in modern days

  • Weight

    5lb.

    Height

    8"

    Width

    3"

    Depth

    3"

    Weight

    5lb.

    Height

    8"

    Width

    3"

    Depth

    3"

    Date

    4th Century BC

    Kind

    Ceramics, Pottery & Crystal, Ethnographic Art & Ancient Artifacts, Prehistoric Art

    Medium

    Terracotta

    Origin

    Greece

    Subject

    Pottery