Giovanni Francesco Romanelli

As a student of Pietro da Cortona, Giovanni Francesco Romanelli was given a prestigious artistic debut by assisting the decoration of Rome’s Palazzo Barberini. Like his teacher, Romanelli was inducted into a group of artists supported by Pope Urban VIII and his nephew, Cardinal Francesco Barberini, whose patronage provided Romanelli with commissions throughout the churches and palaces of Rome and the Vatican. Characterized as espousing a classicized, restrained version of his master’s Roman Baroque style, Romanelli’s work possessed the richly decorative values of his teacher—often embellished with gilded stucco work—and yet with a subdued sense of energy. Upon the exile of the Barberini family, Romanelli accompanied his patrons to Paris, where he became a prominent artistic influence, commissioned to decorate the National Library and the summer apartments of the Queen Mother, Anne of Austria, within the Louvre.

Mayan Civilization

The Maya civilization was a Mesoamerican civilization developed by the Maya peoples, and noted for its hieroglyphic script and wonderful art and ceramic art —the only known fully developed writing system of the pre-Columbian Americas—as well as for its art, architecture, mathematics, calendar, and astronomical system. The Maya civilization developed in an area that encompasses southeastern Mexico, all of Guatemala and Belize, and the western portions of Honduras and El Salvador. This region consists of the northern lowlands encompassing theYucatán Peninsula, and the highlands of the Sierra Madre, running from the Mexican state of Chiapas, across southern Guatemala and onwards into El Salvador, and the southern lowlands of the Pacific littoral plain.

Rafael Alfonso Umaña Mendez (1908-1994), known to most as Umaña, created art for seven decades in New York, France, Spain, Florida, and Virginia, mastering numerous media including textiles; sculpture in marble, silver, and iron; painting and drawings in oil, watercolor, pencil, silver- and goldpoint; printmaking; and fine art book illustration.

Edward Scriven Edward Scriven (Alcester 1775 – 23 August 1841 London) was an English engraver of portraits, in the stipple and chalk manner. Scriven was the pre-eminent engraver of his

Giuseppe Cesari (February 1568 – 3 July 1640) was an Italian Mannerist painter, also named Il Giuseppino and called Cavaliere d'Arpino, because he was created Cavaliere di Cristo by his patron Pope Clement VIII.

Joan Miro

Joan Miró i Ferrà (20 April 1893 – 25 December 1983) was a Spanish painter, sculptor, and ceramicist born in Barcelona. A museum dedicated to his work, the Fundació Joan

Jorn Fox

Jorn Fox was exposed to art at an early age by his father, an art instructor and abstract painter. Even through Jorn had studied in College he believes that his

Bernard Dufour originally studied agricultural engineering. During the German Occupation, he was pressed into war labour. He was sent to Germany with Alain Robbe-Grillet and there they met Claude Ollier.